About chriswhite

Chris White now lives in Melbourne, Australia. He worked for 17 years as Assistant Secretary and Secretary of the United Trades and Labour Council of SA. He was honorary Secretary of APHEDA NT. He is now Convener of APHEDA Victoria. He is active in the Timor Sea Justice Campaign. He started organising with IPAN Independent and Peaceful Australian Network in Darwin and now in Melbourne. He assisted the first IPAN National Conference in Canberra and the Canberra Peace Convergence. He contributes to union challenges at Melbourne meetings and active in protests against the Abbott and Napthine governments. contact chrisdwhite@bigpond.com He was a Honorary Senior Research Fellow at The Northern Institute Charles Darwin University and casual in Industrial Relations. He lived in Canberra from 2005 researching labour law and industrial relations and worked for the union ASMOF and then the NTEU ACT. He tutored in Politics for two years at the ANU Politics and International Relations. He has been criticising WorkChoices, specifically the labour law supressing the right to strike, the repression of building and construction workers, and reporting on the new China labour laws . He writes on social justice and our environmental crisis challenges. He links into international solidarity for workers and the disadvantaged. He worked for the SA unions for 27 years. First as an Industrial Officer for the Australian Workers Union SA branch. Then he was for 10 years Research Officer/Industrial Advocate for the LHMU, then the Miscellaneous Workers Union SA branch, now United Voice. In 1985 he was elected Assistant Secretary of the United Trades and Labor Council of SA and then in 1998 elected Secretary until 2001. He was on the ACTU executive for 15 years. He represented unions on SA Industrial Relations and Occupational Health and Safety and Workers' Compensation and Rehabilitation Commisions and social justice and employment committees. From 1998 to 2002 he was a Director and Trustee of SA Statewide Superannuation Trust and United Superannuation Pty Ltd. He was active in Socially Responsible Investment decisions. For 10 years he was on the board of the SA Working Womens Centre. For 15 years he was Chair of the Junction Theatre Company. For 6 years he was Ministerial Arts Board member on the State Theatre Company. He was awarded a Centenary Medal Commonwealth Honour for contributions to unions and the community. From 2003-2005 he was a Board member SA Housing Trust Board In 2002 he was on the Offenders Aid and Rehabilitation Services (OARS): prison rehabilitation and restorative justice. For 30 years he was active in the SA East Timor Association and now Patron. Since 1974 he has been a member of the ALP and with SA unions organising in state and federal election campaigns. He has been active in the ACTU Your Rights at Work Worth Fighting For campaign. He was a Post Graduate Research PhD scholar 2003-2006 School of Law, Flinders University researching 'The right to strike', but for personal reasons did not complete his thesis. He was a radical student activist, editor of ON DIT and Secretary of the Student's Union. He completed a Law degree LLB and Arts (Honours Politics) in 1972. He then worked for a year as a law tutor at the University of Adelaide Law School before his career with the unions. He is an advocate and consultant on workforce and social justice issues. contact chrisdwhite@bigpond.com
Author Archive | chriswhite
Building and construction workers have less rights than other Australian workers...my references

Building and construction workers have less rights than other Australian workers…my references

References White, C. (2006) ‘Provoking Building and Construction Workers’ 20th Conference AIRAANZ 21st Century Work: High Road or Low Road? http://www.aomevents.com/conferences/AIRAANZ/papers.php. White, C. (2004) Review Jim Marr , ‘First the Verdict The true story of the Building Industry RoyalCommission’ Australian Options, No. 35, Summer 2004 www.australian-options.org.au. White, C. (2006) ‘The Perth 2007 and the right […]

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Rudd's Secret Industrial Inquisition

Rudd’s Secret Industrial Inquisition

Howard’s blandly named Australian Building and Construction Commission, the ABCC remains under Rudd. I re-wote an earlier film review when I heard that in august 2008 the ABCC, under PM Rudd and Minister Gillard, is prosecuting Victorian CFMEU Noel Washington who faces 6 months jail for not answering questions about a union meeting. One way […]

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yraw voting-badge

Exploitation and suppressing strikes in Australia

AUSTRALIA’S WORKCHOICES: EXPLOITATION AND SUPRESSING STRIKES Or do not follow Australian Labour Law Paper for San Francisco Labor Centre University of California Berkeley by Chris White March 2007 Australia’s Prime Minister John Howard proudly aligns his politics with President Bush. PM Howard has led a right-wing neo-liberal government since 1996 and in July 2005 won […]

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The Chinese Unionise Wal-Mart 2006

The Chinese Unionise Wal-Mart 2006

At the high-rise Beijing headquarters of the All-China Federation of Trade Unions (ACFTU) on 30/1/2007, I asked Ms Guo Chen from the Grass-Roots Organization and Capacity Building Department to go through their steps of unionising Wal-Mart. Why? The retailer Wal-Mart is the largest anti-union company in the world. The China union breakthrough is a significant […]

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2008 China labor law reforms - part one The content of the employment contract law

2008 China labor law reforms – part one The content of the employment contract law

China’s President and Communist Party Secretary Hu Jintao and Government Premier Wen Jiabao supported these workplace ‘harmonisation’ reforms. China’s 10th National People’s Congress (NPC) passed the Labor Law on Employment Contracts on June 29th 2007 and in force from 1st January 2008. The Labor Law on Labor Disputes Mediation and Arbitration was operative from May […]

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2008 China labor laws - part two the union ACFTU

2008 China labor laws – part two the union ACFTU

The All China Federation of Trade Unions ACFTUReport july 2008 The enhanced role for China’s union the ACFTU with new legal powers is important. The ACFTU is the one union allowed by law, organised nationally and in industry unions and hierachically in each region, local area and city. Article 11 of the Trade Union Law […]

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strike as a last resort

The right to politically strike

The right to strike on political issues is a controversial contested industrial relations and labour law issue. I wrote this in 2005 and the arguments are more relevant under Rudd Labor. Governments and employers use labour law against the political protests of striking unionists. Controlling industrial action by sanctions (almost) extinguishes the right to strike. […]

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China labor laws 2008-employer compliance and the new conciliation and arbitration system

China labor laws 2008-employer compliance and the new conciliation and arbitration system

Avoidance or compliance? Labor administration strengthened The state apparatus at all levels has stronger compliance powers. Whether they employ sanctions against businesses in breach will be seen. The labor administration departments are to ensure improved investigation, supervision and inspections of companies. Cooney (2007b) details inadequacies in bureaucratic (non)implementation of earlier workplace rules. With inadequate numbers […]

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Women workers will be worse off under WorkChoices

Women face challenges to hold onto rights at work against blackheart Howard 26/6/2005

Women face challenges to hold onto rights at work against blackheart Howard 26/6/2005 Before WorkChoices: Speech ACT Unions Rally Liberal Party Convention Canberra ‘All workers are asking for is human dignity; not to be treated as commodities; not to be treated as servants or worse as slaves to whatever the corporation or government wants. All […]

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